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The Rajon Blog » Blog Archive » Whales and the future of humanity

Whales and the future of humanity

So who said humanity was the only intelligent life on the planet. Do the Japanese think they have majority rule on intelligence I think not!

“To hunt a species to extinction is not logical” Gee I wonder where I heard this before!

To disguise the action in the name of science I am suprised that many other scientists have not jumped and screamed about that one. That is unless they are all in the same boat!

You would think by now that humanity would have grown beyond killing other creatures just for the profit. There are also other reasons they say they do it but none are worth their salt in truth.

If humanity is to survive then it has to learn to treat other animals as equal. The japanese said to me once during a conference once they have lost their spirituality and wanted to rediscover it. Well the whale hunting is sure not the way to go to get it back!

There is a time to stop and that time is now. Any country that kills like this indiscriminately has a price to pay and that price will be high and the environment has a nasty way of sending back what you give off. All creatures on this planet even humans are a part of the biosphere. Mistreat it and it will come back at you big time!

23 Responses to “Whales and the future of humanity”

  1. moryah4 Says:

    Japanese whalers claim vindication

    (August 27, 2008)

    JAPANESE scientists are claiming vindication for their hotly opposed, and lethal, whaling research with a discovery that Antarctic minke whales are fast growing thinner.

    Minkes have lost 306 kilograms, or 9% of their weight, on average over the 18 years of the research program, according to work published in the journal Polar Biology.

    A likely explanation was a decline in the main polar food source, krill, caused by pressure from competitors, said the study led by Kenji Konishi, of Tokyo’s Institute of Cetacean Research.

    The institute says lethal research of whales is the only way to measure accurately body weight or blubber thickness.

    Its claim that humpback whale numbers are expanding so rapidly that minkes are being harmed was used to support a proposal, currently suspended, to kill 50 humpbacks annually from Australian migratory stocks.

    In the past year, Japan has killed 695 whales in the Antarctic and North Pacific. Despite more than a decade of study, the status of the Antarctic minke population remains undecided, according to the World Conservation Union.

    Any discovery that one species was doing worse than expected meant greater reason to show caution rather than go hunting for more, said Darren Kindleysides, campaigns manager for the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

    “It’s the most grotesque irony that Japan’s scientists are killing whales in an attempt to prove that they are more at risk,” he said.

    ANDREW DARBY with GUARDIAN

    http://www.theage.com.au/world/japanese-whalers-claim-vindication-20080826-42ze.html

  2. moryah4 Says:

    Recently report of the stock market and its worldwide demise show Japan has suffered some of the worst losses second to Iceland.
    Zarlen has warned about killing intelligent species like dolphins and whales that not only have brains almos as sophisticated as ours but also are alot more advance in areas like acoustics which they are able to use to manipulate their environment.
    So be warned said Zarlen these beings have a tolerance level and if the senseless slaughter continues they can come back to bite you in a number of ways.
    Also saw this article recently :

    ‘DOLPHIN HUNT SAGS AMID MERCURY FEAR’

    By Joseph Coleman
    TAIJI, Japan January 30, 2008
    (AP) The Associated Press

    Every autumn and winter, hunters from this craggy Japanese fishing village corral thousands of dolphins into a tiny, isolated cove and kill them for meat and fertilizer, turning the water red with their blood. And every year, foreign animal rights protesters converge on the town, interfering with the slaughter, clashing with fishermen and broadcasting grisly photographs of the slayings around the world all without stopping the hunt.
    Now, Japan’s dolphin hunters face a new, powerful opponent: mercury contamination.
    A series of scientific studies in recent years in Japan have documented high levels of the toxic heavy metal in dolphin meat, and a group of city councilmen in Taiji launched an unprecedented campaign against the hunt several months ago after doing their own tests.
    A leading regional supermarket chain has pulled dolphin from its shelves over the health concerns, and hunt critics in the town say villagers are shunning it. Meat from pilot whales a type of dolphin was taken off local school lunch menus in October.Indeed, while animal rights arguments against the hunt have fallen on deaf ears in Japan, the threat of mercury contamination strikes a chord in a country where food safety is rapidly becoming a paramount public concern.
    Though no mercury poisoning cases from dolphin meat have been publicly documented in Taiji, such contamination resonates loudly in Japan, where thousands were killed or crippled by mercury poisoning in Minamata in the 1950s and 60s.
    Taiji is one of several Japanese villages where dolphins are hunted. The town this season has a nationally set quota of 3,015, of a total national quota of nearly 21,000. The actual take tends to be about 30 percent lower than the quota, depending on demand for the meat.
    “The mayor says we’ve caused 100 million yen ($1 million) in damages to the industry, but I don’t know how that’s calculated,” said Junichiro Yamashita, a city councilman spearheading the anti-hunt movement. “They say the business is important for Taiji, but we say that health is more important.”
    …Tetsuya Endo, a researcher at the Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, in northern Japan, has co-authored numerous studies showing dolphin meat can contain mercury at concentrations many times higher than the 0.4 parts per million allowed by the Japanese government for many types of fish.
    The highest concentration he has found so far was 100 parts per million from a bottlenose dolphin a species whose meat is butchered in Taiji.
    “This ought to be investigated,” Endo said, calling for a government probe into the dangers of eating dolphin. “There are people who eat it a lot, and those people could be suffering health effects.”

    The threat of mercury contamination, however, failed to cause a stir in this isolated village until Yamashita, irked by the town’s plans to build a $3 million dolphin slaughterhouse and spread the use of local dolphin meat in school lunches, decided with allies to conduct their own probe.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/WireStory?id=4217782&page=2

  3. moryah4 Says:

    6 ORCAS MISSING

    October 14, 2008 Just in from Orca Network;

    It has been a difficult year for the endangered Southern Resident orca population, and after wrapping up their annual survey in late September, the Center for Whale Research has reported that seven whales are missing at this time, and with the addition of one new surviving calf, the population is now believed to be at 83 (click here for Orca Network’s births/deaths page).

    In addition to 98 year old female K7/”Lummi”, the elder of K pod, also missing are:

    23 year old L67/”Splash” (Luna’s mom), and

    six year old L101/”Aurora” (Luna’s brother),

    58 year old female L21/”Ankh”,

    36 year old female J11/”Blossom”,

    and two unnamed calves, J43 (missing last winter) and L111 born in August 2008 to L47, missing by the end of August).

    Only one calf born this year survives, K42, born in June.

    It has been apparent to those observing the whales this summer that salmon have not been in abundance - all three pods have had to leave the Salish Sea area on and off during the summer in search of salmon, and when they were present, they often were traveling in widely spread out groups, which typically means they are having to spread out to find enough salmon to feed the pod.

    Our hope is for a strong chum salmon run this fall in Puget Sound, so the whales can get some nutrition before the winter season, when they leave the inland waters in search of food up and down the coast.

    But if we don’t act NOW to restore the Chinook salmon runs in the Pacific, this trend will likely continue, and the population is already so small that its survival hangs in the balance.

    (Introduction to Orcagirl
    Media artist Orcagirl is Maria Chantelle Tucker who (BAA Image Arts, Ryerson University, Toronto ON) is an independent documentarian (photographer), web producer and creative consultant located in Playa del Carmen Mexico and Victoria British Columbia Canada. Her passion is marine life and natural environments.

    Chantelle is studying Occupational & Environmental Health through UVIC’s Distant education program. She works to combine her skills in a variety of creative ways. She is currently developing a new ecological, sustainable, holistic project in the jungles of the Maya Riviera.)

    http://orcagirl.com/2008/10/14/6-orcas-missing/

  4. moryah4 Says:

    Dr. Roger S. Payne - Ocean Alliance Founder & President

    Dr. Roger Payne is best known for his discovery (with Scott McVay) that humpback whales sing songs, and for his theory that the sounds of fin and blue whales can be heard across oceans. He has studied the behavior of whales since 1967 and is founder and President of the Ocean Alliance. His BA degree is from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. from Cornell.

    He has led over 100 expeditions to all oceans and studied every species of large whale in the wild. He pioneered many of the benign research techniques now used throughout the world to study free-swimming whales, and has trained many of the current leaders in whale research, both in America and abroad. He directs long term research projects on the songs of Humpback whales, and on the behavior of 1300 individually known Argentine right whales in the longest continuous study of it’s kind.

    Payne publishes technical articles and writes for general audiences. One of his three articles in National Geographic Magazine contained a record of whale sounds for which 10.5 million copies were printed - still the largest single print order in the history of the recording industry. His publications include the book, “Among Whales” (1995) and three recordings: “Songs of the Humpback Whale” (1970 - the best selling natural history recording ever released), “Deep Voices”, (1975), and (with Musician Paul Winter) “Whales Alive”, (1989 - compositions composed by whales but arranged and played by humans). Payne has lectured at most major universities in the U.S. and England, and has appeared on most major TV and radio talk shows. He is a writer and presenter for television documentaries, and co-writer and co-director of the IMAX film “Whales” a co-production of The National Wildlife Federation, Destination Cinema, and Zephyr Productions (Payne’s company). Much of the material in this film is based on Payne’s research.

    Payne’s honors and awards, include: a knighthood in the Netherlands, a MacArthur Fellowship (a $325,000 prize) the similar Lyndhurst Prize Fellowship ($120,000), the Joseph Wood Krutch Medal of the Humane Society of the U.S., The Albert Schweitzer Medal of the Animal Welfare Institute, and a United Nations, UNEP, “Global 500″ Award. His films have received seven awards including two Emmy nominations and an Emmy for best interview.

    http://www.oceanalliance.org/oceanalliance/oa_rogerpayne.html

  5. moryah4 Says:

    Here is an illuminating and tragic article by Roger Payne on how our present day society has had a hand in poisoning the oceans and how his beloved whales are like the ‘canaries in the coal mine’.
    Payne shows how how the cause and effect scenario threatens the dietary intake of billions of the world’s population:

    Roger Payne
    Ocean Alliance
    The thing we have been doing most recently is working on the problems of pollution of
    the sea. Humanity faces the possible loss of the major protein source from the ocean, the
    major animal protein source for 1.8 billion people, which is a lot of people.
    The real problem that whales used to face was harpoons, but now there are 2 other threats
    that are more serious. In spite of the fact that whaling (was banned and) is returning, it’s
    coming back. All international controls are about to be lost. These two other problems
    one is entanglement in fishing gear, and the second one is pollutants. Pollutants
    accumulate as they move up food chains. The result of that is the ocean is terribly
    polluted, and we don’t know how badly. So about 8 years ago, I sent my institute the job
    of taking our boat, the Odyssey, around the world and collecting small biopsy samples
    from sperm whales. You shoot a dart into the whale. The whale usually doesn’t even
    respond, and you get a tiny scrap of tissue. You can analyze it and figure out what sort of
    pollutants it contains.
    What we have found to my absolute horror is far worse than my worst nightmares. The
    persistent organic pollutants– things that are for instance hormone mimics are very bad.
    They are increasing, but it is metals that are the real problem, totally surprising. We all
    expected mercury in everything in the sea. But, we didn’t expect such shocking
    concentrations of chromium, cadmium, aluminum, and things like that. These are coming
    in from industrial processes presumably, and the amounts that we have found are so high
    that nobody can even believe it. We checked by looking at further samples. We haven’t
    completed the full analysis because it’s still early after our return. We found that though
    we get between five and 15 times the concentration that kills sperm whale cells in tissue
    cultures, you also get 185 times the dose that breaks up chromosomes when cells are
    divided.
    So is this a problem? Well, 1.8 billion people have as their principal source of animal
    protein, fish from the sea, seafood. What happens if you remove from those 1.8 billion
    people their major source of animal protein because it has become too poisonous to eat?
    Well, I think you have a problem…

    http://www.pbs.org/journeytoplanetearth/about/expert_pdfs/payne.pdf

  6. moryah4 Says:

    When it comes to the preservation and protection of whales from being hunted by the Japanese in Southern Waters the Australian Labour government headed by Mr Kevin Rudd are proving as ‘gutless’ as the last Liberal Government.They have dropped off from the task of surveying the carnage of the ‘gentle giants’ that goes on down south .Greenpeace has also dropped out of the loop.Leaving only the Sea Shepherd group down there on their own.

    JAPANESE HUNT TO GO

    (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Broadcast: 21/11/2008

    Reporter: Shane McLeod

    Australia will not send a ship to the Southern Ocean to observe Japan’s whaling fleet this season, as International Convention on Whaling negotiations continue.

    LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: Japan has welcomed news that Australia won’t send a ship to observe its fleet in the Southern Ocean whale hunt this season. It says the move is appropriate while both countries continue discussing the hunt in the International Whaling Commission.
    In Australia, the Opposition’s environment spokesman says the Government’s giving Japan the green light to kill more whales, but even his own leader says confrontation isn’t the solution to the whaling issue.

    SHANE MCLEOD, REPORTER: Actions not words were the tools Australia’s Government took to Japan’s whaling in the Southern Ocean last season. But having dispatched the Oceanic Viking to tail the fleet through much of last summer, the Environment Minister says there’s no need for it to head back….

    (footage)
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/video/2008/11/21/2426

    (transcript)
    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2008/s2426875.htm

  7. moryah4 Says:

    WHILE THE CATS AWAY THE MICE WILL PLAY

    (Quote: moryah4) :

    December 21st, 2008

    When it comes to the preservation and protection of whales from being hunted by the Japanese in Southern Waters the Australian Labour government headed by Mr Kevin Rudd are proving as ‘gutless’ as the last Liberal Government.They have dropped off from the task of surveying the carnage of the ‘gentle giants’ that goes on down south .Greenpeace has also dropped out of the loop.Leaving only the Sea Shepherd group down there on their own.

    SEA SHEPHERD PERSUING JAPANESE YUSHIN MARU 2 IN AUSTRALIAN ANTARCTIC WATERS

    December 21, 2008

    THE Sea Shepherd anti-whaling group says it has the Japanese whaling fleet on the run, after intercepting a harpoon vessel in Australian Antarctic waters.

    The anti-whaling ship Steve Irwin, led by Captain Paul Watson, intercepted the Japanese harpoon vessel Yushin Maru 2 in the Australian Antarctic Economic Exclusion Zone at 10.45pm AEDT, the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society said in a statement.

    “We’ve got them on the run. They are not in the Ross Sea where they said they would be. They are in Australian waters,” Capt Watson said.

    Capt Watson said the Steve Irwin was now in pursuit of the Yushin Maru 2.

    “They have ceased whaling operations and they are now running from the Sea Shepherd crew,” Capt Watson said.

    “If we can keep it on the run or shut down there’s no whaling.”

    He called on the Federal Government to order the whalers to stop the hunt.

    “The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society is officially calling on Australian Environment Minister Peter Garrett and Foreign Minister Stephen Smith to order the Japanese fleet to comply with the orders of the Australian Federal Court and to cease and desist from killing whales in Australian waters,” he said.

    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,27574,24830137-401,00.html

  8. moryah4 Says:

    And while the ruling Labour Party (Rudd) Government take the GUTLESS sit on the fence and make token gestures to the environment,in particular to protecting the whale species in the Southern Oceans.While feeding the national coffers from the proceeds of Coal sales to the world,aprticurarly our big partner in environmental crime China,while burning up a big dose of it ourselves to provide the national power grid,we turn our attention to see what if anything is being done to stop the Japanese from wantonly slaughtering another 1000 whales and who knows how many dolphins and smaller whale species within their own coastlines ?
    present report is the ‘Sea Shepherd’ vessel are carrying on their ‘David versus Goliath’ battle relentlessly shadowing the Japanese fleet.

    SEA SHEPHERD NEWS

    (Friday, December 19, 2008)

    “Japanese Whaling Fleet Is On the Run”

    http://www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/news-081219-2.html

    Also this report from the “LA Times”

    “Whale hunt, Sea Shepherd saga and debate continue ”

    (December 29, 2008)

    When a country (Japan) chooses to kill whales despite international opposition, and a controversial group (Sea Shepherd Conservation Society) decides to intervene, people from around the world take notice.

    An item posted on Outposts last week generated 46 comments, mostly from people opposing Japan’s annual slaughter performed under the guise of research, and many from people who either admire or despise Sea Shepherd’s founder, Capt. Paul Watson, whose credibility has been questioned and whose methods of disrupting hunts can seem dangerous and foolhardy.

    The latest report from Watson and his crew is that they’ve chased Japan’s whaling fleet out of Australian waters and deeper into the Antarctic region, and have so far kept the whalers from enjoying an uninterrupted period to find and kill whales.

    My take is simply that whales deserve a break, and it’s refreshing to see there are groups trying to ensure they get one.

    The international moratorium placed on whaling in 1986 (with a stupid loophole, allowing kills for research) was imposed to enable whales to rebound from what, for many species, was the brink of extinction.

    Not every commenter opposed the hunts. One claimed Japan’s killing of whales for meat (after scientific study, of course) was no different than us killing cows for hamburgers.

    One major difference is that cows are dumb animals raised specifically for human consumption, while whales are wild creatures capable of communicating with song, and of great migrations to propagate.

    Another difference is that whale meat, unlike beef, is not in demand. Japan is trying merely to maintain a long-standing whaling tradition. A Greenpeace spokesman emailed me a link to a BBC story published three years ago.

    It implied that Japan was literally trying to force whale meat on schoolchildren, frying it in breadcrumbs or mincing it into burgers. Essentially, Japan’s younger residents do not like whale meat.

    It was last popular after World War II, as a cheap source of protein. Beef and fresh fish, not whale meat, are preferred among most Japanese.

    Understandably, Japan does not like being told what it can and cannot do. A fisheries official was quoted in the BBC story as stating, “Why do people in the West make such a big deal about our very limited hunting of whales? How would they feel if we told Americans they couldn’t hunt deer, or if we told Australians to stop hunting kangaroos?”

    I don’t know about kangaroos, but deer hunting is a wildlife management tool designed to prevent herds from growing beyond their carrying capacities, whereupon they’d become susceptible to disease and population collapse. And deer hunting has not been condemned globally.

    So while a nation clings to culture and tradition, Sea Shepherd maintains the fight as the lone group involved in direct confrontation, now that Greenpeace has decided against sending a boat to the region.

    This much is clear: With no boats on site, there would be no disruption and more whales would die.

    – Pete Thomas

  9. moryah4 Says:

    The Dominion Post | Monday, 01 December 2008

    Editorial: a pointless and cruel slaughter

    Japan’s decision to continue its annual slaughter of whales in the Southern Ocean defies both morality and self-interest, The Dominion Post writes.

    It offends morality because it depends on the cynical exploitation of a loophole in the moratorium on commercial whaling that allows for “scientific” whaling to keep up the supply of whale meat to the fish markets of Japan.

    It is against Japan’s self-interest because the damage it does to that country’s reputation far outweighs any gains from the minute contribution it makes to the Japanese economy.

    The announcement yesterday that New Zealand will send an Orion to keep tabs on the Japanese whalers is a small step in the right direction after Defence Minister Wayne Mapp’s initial weak-kneed response that monitoring this season was unlikely.

    What is needed now is more pressure, not less, if Japan is to be persuaded to stop.

    It was pressure during the last whaling season that saw Japan back away from plans to slaughter humpback whales, and pressure which has led to expectations that this year the numbers taken will be lower than the usual 1000, with a kill of 750 minke and 50 fin whales.

    That pressure was fuelled by the damaging publicity that Japan endured last season, especially as a result of Australian Customs officials monitoring the whaling - and releasing pictures that graphically portrayed the reality of it.

    New Zealand would have done well to take up where the Australians have decided to leave off, and to have sent a naval vessel. However the Orion flights may go some way to filling the gap, and to strengthening the hand of the realists in Japan who want to see an end to their whalers coming to the Southern Ocean.

  10. moryah4 Says:

    SCIENTISTS MONITOR HABITAT USE BY RARE NORTH PACIFIC RIGHT WHALES

    ScienceDaily (June 23, 2005) — The small population of North Pacific right whales, found during the summer in Alaska waters, is one of the most critically endangered whale populations in the world. Commercial whaling in the 1800s has now left us with only a few dozens. Recently these whales have been recognized as a different species from right whales seen in the North Atlantic and others in the Southern Hemisphere.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050622142743.htm

  11. moryah4 Says:

    THE MIRNING PEOPLE

    Are aboriginal people from the Nullarbor in South Australia.(Nullabor is an aboriginal word meaning ‘treeless plain’).
    The Miring people have a special asscociation with the Southern Right Whale.As opposed to other indigenous clans from other places around the world who share similar ancient bonds with whales and dolphins, the Mirning asscociation’s has always been a peaceful,non-aggressive kinship.They had what they called a “Dreamtime connection” with the Southern Right Whale and traditionally held ceremonies on a remote cliff top in South Australia to show gratitude for this connection.
    The following is a transcript of a 3-part Australian television series called Message Stick (which features topical australian aboriginal stories )with this episode about the Mirning people titled “The Gathering” - Part 1.

    The Gathering is a 3 part documentary series filmed over the past 10 years, and is a story of the re-awakening of the whale dreaming by the Mirning people of the Nullabour. The journey details the unlikely collaboration between English born film-maker Kim Kindersley and Bunna Lawrie, formerly front man of one of Australia’s most popular indigenous bands “Coloured Stone”, and the call for an international gathering of respected elders. The Gathering took place on a remote cliff top in South Australia.

    The Gathering, is an experiential film for our times and takes the viewer deep into a journey of dreams, interwoven dreams and the magic that connects us all.

    Transcript
    Transcript of Program
    ADEN RIDGEWAY: Hello, and welcome to Message Stick. I’m Aden Ridgeway. Coming up, it’s the first episode of a very special three-part documentary series called ‘The Gathering’. Filmed over the past 10 years, ‘The Gathering’ is a story about the re-awakening of the Whale Dreaming by the Mirning People, one of the nations connected to this story, from the Nullarbor in South Australia. This week, we discover how an English filmmaker and the former leader of one of our most popular Indigenous bands came together in a most unlikely collaboration to call for an international gathering of elders on a remote cliff top in South Australia. It’s an intriguing and important series, so come on a journey with us to ‘The Gathering’.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): In September 1998, on a remote cliff top in southern Australia, 85 indigenous elders and others from around the globe came together to share their traditions and spirituality. Their hopes, their dreams for a better world. The Gathering was called by two people from very different cultures. One, a song man from a tribe of displaced people. The other, a filmmaker from a distant land. This is a story that embraces creation myths and legends that began in stars. A story of confrontation. Of decimated indigenous cultures. And fractured tribes. Of a world in peril. But it is also a story of great hope. Of the return of a tribe of Aboriginal Whale Dreamers. Of meetings with people of influence. And the re-awakening to our collective connection with the natural world. But what really happened on that remote cliff top? What ideas were seeded there? And how were the stories that were revealed at that time relevant today and continuing to unfold? Our song man is my cousin, Bunna Lawrie. We are the Jirkala Mirning from southern Australia.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: (Sings) # We are gathered on this land # Together all as one… #

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): He was born and raised on Koonibba Mission, on the edge of the Nullarbor. Bunna has been lead singer with the Australian Indigenous band Coloured Stone for over 25 years. He has taken his music and message all over Australia, even to the remotest of communities. For over 10 years, Bunna has been working on a documentary film project about our fragile culture, and its relevance to the world today. His partner in this venture is a filmmaker, Kim Kindersley. You are probably wondering what brought about this unlikely collaboration between two people from such different cultures.

    KIM KINDERSLEY: I was working as an actor in London at the time, living a seemingly blessed existence. On the surface, I had everything I was supposed to have - a house, career, relationship and so on. But deep down, I just wasn’t happy. In the spring of 1990, I decided to go on a trip around Ireland, to reconnect with my ancestral roots. I ended up in Dingle Bay, a small fishing village on the west coast. I went out on a fishing boat, early in the morning. And I saw this lone hermit dolphin, who the locals had named Fungie, leaping out of the dark, cold water. I felt I just had to join him. He swam right towards me, looked right through me. In that moment, everything changed for me. I felt connected to all life, nature, everything. I spent a few weeks experiencing these intimate encounters, and decided to give up acting. Shortly after, with what seemed like miraculous help, I made my first documentary film, ‘The Dolphin’s Gift’. Then I began to travel around the world, researching the connection between humanity and the whales and dolphins. I discovered that in many places, there are these extraordinary deep bonds between the mammals of the sea and us, steeped in both myth and legend. Everywhere I went, at every opportunity, I experienced being with all kinds of dolphins and whales. Each time, the feeling of connection deepened. The ultimate was with the humpback whales. As I met with more and more indigenous people who shared many of their creation stories with me, my encounters with them opened me up to the profound beauty in the natural world, particularly encapsulated in our relationship with these beings in the seas. Eventually I put my findings into the form of a promotional film.

    JOHN HURT: Here by the fire, I will share with you legends and tales that began in the stars far, far away.

    KIM KINDERSLEY: Which I then sent around the world, one to a group of Aboriginal people in Australia I had heard about in the early ’90s who had what they called a “Dreamtime connection” with the Southern Right Whale. I was really intrigued.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: I saw a promo of a video of a dude that was doing research on dolphin and whale myths. And when I saw the dolphin’s eye, I was drawn to it, and I knew there was some sort of connection from dolphin to whale, so we invited Kim to come down and come on our country.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): So in the early ’90s, Kim found himself travelling deep into the Nullarbor Plain in southern Australia, on the first of many journeys as a guest of us Mirning Whale Dreamers.

    KIM KINDERSLEY: I remember in those early days watching the Mirning treading so softly on their precious traditional land, with so much love and with so much care. I remember clearly the impact of being shown the Whale Rock for the first time. They told me that the Great Australian Bight is the gateway to the galaxy. To their Dreaming, and the Dreamtime.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: Well, the Dreamtime is made up of stories that were told by the fire just like this. Well, the fire to the Mirning is so important, and it’s been a special part of the Mirning’s Dreaming. In our language, ‘fire’ means ‘gulah’. And all our stories were passed down from my grandfather, my mother and my cousins. Of myths and legends, of the beginning.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): A long time ago, a great White Whale Spirit came - Jiddara. He came from the stars to swim in the oceans of the infinite void. As the Seven Sisters chased down after him, Jiddara dove into the vast blue depths, thrashing his tail, and rose to meet the dawn. Creating the Earth and the sky, leaving the echoes of his Dreamtime journey imprinted in the Whale Rock. We are born as a result of the whale… ..being the mother of the sea.

    MAN: We are the Mirning, an old people from an ancient land. In the time of the Beginning, we were born from the ocean, in the foam along the shores of the great south seas. In the dance of the Beginning, we were born to dream the whales. The whale is our family. Over thousands of years, we have come to this place where the whales gather every winter to mate and give birth. We share food together, we eat shellfish off the same table - the reefs. They are our brothers and sisters in the ocean. When we die, it is with them we return, to the Morning Star.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): Despite our rich cultural heritage, like many Aboriginal peoples we, the Jirkala Mirning, suffered terribly at the hands of history. I don’t like to say it, but it was a policy of geno… it was really genocide, you know? When the Europeans came to this country, we were herded into reservations and forced to leave our traditional culture behind. A lot of Aboriginal people had to… learn to become Christians. And a lot of people have taken on that…that religion, various religions. So, there was a period where the churches took over.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: My cousin Iris, who is still living today, she lived through that life.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): Iris Burgoyne, my cousin, is one of the most respected of a clan of Mirning elders. She was born at the Koonibba Mission on the west coast of South Australia. Like so many Aboriginal people of this time, she was one of the Stolen Generation.

    IRIS BURGOYNE: And she grabbed two little kids one day from this lady, and she put them in the car - they came with a government car - and away they went. And that woman never saw those two little kids again. It was very hard. My father was taken away when he was a young man.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): At a young age, Iris was plucked from her family, as her father had been, and sent to work as a domestic servant.

    IRIS BURGOYNE: They were doing some wicked things, but I can’t say any… I’d like to say it… But I can’t say… If they say you was a peace-loving man, why did they do these things to people? And they believed in God. We had to just do as we were told by them.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): Us Mirning who for years had been involved in our own tribal conflicts were further wiped out by various so-called flu epidemics and other diseases.

    IRIS BURGOYNE: My people knew it different. They said, “That’s not influenza. “He wasn’t sick, he was quite alright last night.” That morning, he’s gone. I reckon they poisoned them.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): Then came the whaling. Furthermore, our special relationship with the whale was severely compromised with the introduction of whaling in our coastal waters.

    WOMAN: The Mirning people just got right away from it. ‘Cause they couldn’t stand to see the whales getting killed and speared and things like that.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: It’s like watching your own children being killed. Part of the family. It was horrible.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): Over the last 300 years, millions of these magnificent beings have been killed. And well before the world’s petrochemical dependence - it was with the oil and blubber of our totemic sacred animals that the 19th Century’s industrial revolution was built. As the whale’s populations came close to extinction, according to the government of South Australia, so did ours. To make things worse for us, in the late-1950s the British Government, together with their Australian allies, conducted a series of nuclear weapons tests. The Anangu people were forced to vacate their traditional spinifex country around Maralinga and Emu, and relocate to the Mission at Yalata, in my country. Maralinga remains uninhabitable, and radioactive to this day. The Anangu people were given the leasehold of our Mirning country, both tribes forcibly separated from our Dreaming lands.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: The government moved that tribe down onto the coastal land, which is the Mirning land. And the 99-year lease covered most of our sacred whale sites. It was very difficult for a tribe like the Mirning to go back and…and dream the land and dream your totems. And when you’re not there, you don’t feel part of it. We feel lost that we haven’t got our land. If you like. We lose the Dreaming.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): However, secretly, Bunna, along with a few of my other Mirning family, started to regularly visit our different Dreaming sites. You know, we’ve been fighting for this land for over 100 years.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: Yeah, my grandfather Mickey Free, he wrote a letter to the Protector of Aborigines at that time, the early-20th Century, and he was refused. And from that day to this day, we have not got - our Mirning people - have not got a block of land to live on.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): Over time, my Mirning relatives continued to visit our sacred sites, despite the pain of our legal claims not being recognised. In the ’70s, land rights and the struggle for justice became a national issue. We went through that period of anger and resentment, and…marching down the streets and that type of thing. We went through that, we went through that. At the same time, Greenpeace and other environmental groups formed in response to global destruction of our whales, and the threat of nuclear war. Through their heroic efforts, and the wave of global popular support, the whale’s population started to recover slowly, as did our spiritual strength, and the future of us Mirning. But it was most importantly in our hearts that the connection of our totems the whales continued to grow stronger. It was around that time that Bunna took Kim to Miranagu, the place where our Mirning ancestors traditionally called the whales.

    KIM KINDERSLEY: I witnessed two whales way out in the bay. They lined up and leapt through the water. And they swam to where Bunna and Clem were standing. Then this one whale came right up out of the water underneath us and roared. I was overwhelmed by the power and beauty of this experience. In that moment, I knew that the Mirning’s connection with the whales was true. It took me back to my first connection with the dolphin in Ireland. Back in the camp, I shared with Bunna stories of some of the other tribes that I’d met through my research who were also connected to the whales and dolphins and, for the most part, were still living in their traditional ways.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): In many indigenous cultures, just like ours, symbols in nature are powerful omens of the times we are living in. For us Mirning, the birth of white whales is of immense significance.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: The white whale is a special whale, and when it comes down, it’s a warning to us, telling us to take care of Mother Earth.

    KIM KINDERSLEY: I heard it’s said that the white whale prophecy heralded the recognition of the Mirning as Whale Dreamers, and was a symbol of great hope for all humanity. So, it was decided to call a gathering of some of the indigenous elders and whale tribes that I had met from around the world. To come and bear witness.

    BUNNA LAWRIE: My name is Bunna Lawrie. This is Clem Lawrie and this is Rob Lawrie. We are the people from the Nullarbor, the Mirning tribe, and we would like to welcome you to come to our land on the Nullarbor and celebrate with us the Year of the Dreaming and the People of the Whale.

    MARGARET LAWRIE (NARRATOR): So we sent out this video invitation from Miranagu. As the months passed, we wondered whether our dream of recognition would become a reality. Whether the gathering would happen at all…

    JULIAN LENNON SINGS: # We are a rock revolving # Around a golden sun # We are a billion children rolled into one # So when I hear about the hole in the sky, # Saltwater wells in my eyes. #

    END.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/messagestick/stories/s1737658.htm

  12. moryah4 Says:

    Where do you begin and I end?

    We are the Mirning, an old people from an ancient land. In the time of the Beginning, we were born from the ocean, in the foam along the shores of the great south seas. In the dance of the Beginning, we were born to dream the whales. The whale is our family. Over thousands of years, we have come to this place where the whales gather every winter to mate and give birth. We share food together, we eat shellfish off the same table - the reefs. They are our brothers and sisters in the ocean. When we die, it is with them we return, to the Morning Star. Mirning of Nullabor

    There is no logic or reason to how a group of people called the Mirning who live in the south western region of Australia can call the whales out of the ocean’s depth. Or, how a group of elders from 85 indigenous communities from different corners of the earth, can come together and use their ancient songs, rituals and dance to heal a land and give hope to each other.

    There is no explanation; only experience.

    For those who know the stories of the universe, have already seen the signs that we are on the brink of extinction. The birth of a white whale, a white buffalo and a white raven signifies the urgent need to re-awaken our consciousness and understand how we are all connected so that we can take care of our home, our planet.

    If we forget this song, the world will end, says an elder in Whaledreamers. It is with the hope we can stop the world from ending, that a one time actor turned filmmaker Kim Kindersely from the UK, a Mirning song man Bunna Lawrie, a movie producer and son of John Lennon, Julian Lennon, and the elders of indigenous people from around the world gather on a cliff top in S.W. Australia, called the Whale Rock ~ the Mirning gateway to the cosmos.

    Like all indigenous people, the Mirning too are on the verge of cultural extinction, affected by commercial whaling, a practice they abhor, and the loss of their traditional Dreaming lands, most recently with the Whale Rock on which their ancient whale calling song was performed for centuries.

    While on a personal quest to explore the unusual connections he had made several years before while swimming with dolphins, Kim Kindersley meets with Bunna Lawrie, who is on his own mission to share one message with the world ~ to stop the killing of whales. With his help, Laurie issues invitations to indigenous groups around the world to come to Mirning with the hope they will learn from each other so that all of mankind can work together to protect the earth from more destruction.

    At first, the obstacles are many; money is in short supply and, later, they aren’t sure if the invited guests will come as hoped. But they do, two years later.

    From the UK to Bight in S.W. Australia, Whaledreamers documents a 15 year journey of self-awareness. Songs, rituals and totems are interspersed with breathtaking photography of whales and dolphins, and all come together to be shared in extraordinary ways. It is also a story of idealists and passionate seekers like Terence Unity Freitas, an environmentalist and indigenous rights activist who was murdered in 1999 for his work with the U’wa in Columbia, of Bunna Lawrie and Kindersley; of deep pain suffered through genocides, loss of land and occupation; and a story of deep wisdom and hope.

    Most of all, it is a compelling heartfelt plea that we, as humans, must urgently understand our place in the world if we are to edge back from the cliff we are poised on.

    By the time Whaledreamers weaves together these multi-layered stories, one is left deeply saddened: not just for the whales or the Mirnings and the injustices that indigenous people have suffered for years, but more for those like us who have forgotten the songs that connect us to each other and the universe.

    Posted on 11/17/2008

    http://www.nafella.com/naflogger/?SimpleLiving/Dream_Time_in_a_Material_Culture

  13. moryah4 Says:

    DREAMING OF WHALES

    Reporter: Marguerite McKinnon

    (September 17, 2008)

    A movie produced by John Lennon’s son Julian is a compelling story about the plight of whales and those trying to save them.

    Bunna Lawrie is a whale-dreamer who sings to the giants of the ocean.

    “We have this gift in us where we can sing to the whales and they respond to us because they know our language,” he said.

    “Our ancestors have been there for centuries.”

    Bunna, from Adelaide’s coastal Mirning tribe is travelling the world, taking his message to children and anyone who will listen.

    “It’s time to really come together and be as one and we can all be guardians as one as well as brothers and sisters and really take care of this planet,” he said.

    “Take care of our whales and dolphins and look after them and do the right thing.”

    This remarkable connection has been made into a motion picture, Whaledreamers.

    Jack Thompson narrates the story of the Mirning people and how they sing to whales. It is a skill taught over hundreds of years.

    Singer Julian Lennon got to know the Mirning people through his love of whales but everything changed when they gave him a white feather as a gift.

    Thirty years ago, his dad John told him: “If anything ever happens to me, look for a white feather and you’ll know I’m there looking out for you.”

    Many Australians have woken up to the plight of whales, disgusted by the incessant killing of them in the name of scientific research.

    More recently, the tragic story of Colin the Whale attracted international attention after it became stuck in Sydney Harbour, searching for its mum.

    Bunna travelled to Sydney and informed authorities Colin was indeed a female but he arrived too late to save the abandoned calf.

    Now Whaledreamers is sounding the call that doing something can no longer be left to green groups.

    “Nobody’s trying to shove the problems down people’s throats but it’s something that everybody needs to be aware of,” Julian said in the movie.

    “One way or another we all try and pull together and do something about it.”

    In the firing line are governments for putting business over the environment.

    Australia’s nuclear testing in the 1950s at Maralinga has left the area uninhabitable and displaced two aboriginal tribes, including Bunna Lawrie’s Mirning tribe.

    Despite this, Whaledreamers gives a message of hope, that healing the environment will help mankind.

    http://au.todaytonight.yahoo.com/article/5021482/general/dreaming-whales

  14. moryah4 Says:

    WHALEDREAMERS WEBSITE

    http://www.whaledreamers.com/html/

  15. moryah4 Says:

    RETURN OF THE WHALE DREAMERS

    What connects a dispossessed aboriginal people to the son of rock legend John Lennon? A powerful new documentary film made by British film maker Kim Kindersley that follows a gathering of indigenous tribal leaders to explore the profound relationship between whales, dolphins and humanity. Sam Burcher

    http://www.i-sis.org.uk/WhaleDreamers.php

  16. moryah4 Says:

    JAPANESE WHALERS FEAR ‘AUSSIE ARREST’.

    12-01-2009 The Age, Australia

    Japanese whalers sent a damaged vessel thousands of kilometres to be repaired in Indonesia because they feared arrest if they landed in Australia, an anti-whaling group says. The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society said one of Japan’s three main harpoon vessels, the Yushin Maru No.2, was damaged around December 20.
    Since then, the vessel had avoided docking at relatively close ports in Australia or New Zealand, and travelled all the way to Surabaya, Indonesia for repairs, Sea Shepherd founder Paul Watson said on Monday.
    “They can be served with a warrant if they go into Australia,” Captain Watson told AAP via satellite phone from the Southern Ocean.
    “There is a Federal Court order banning them from whaling in Australian territorial waters and they are in contempt of that order.
    “They could be detained. They won’t go into an Australian or New Zealand port.”

    Last year, Japan told the International Whaling Commission it intended to operate its whaling fleet in waters off the Australian Antarctic territory.

    Such a move would contravene Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade stipulations, which only allow the Japanese research vessel the Shonan Maru No.2 to operate in the region.
    Japan’s Institute of Cetacean Research (ICR) refused to say whether the Japanese fleet had this season operated in waters claimed by Australia.

    Spokesman Glenn Inwood said he understood the whaling ships were banned from docking in Australian ports.
    “Japanese vessels whenever they have needed any sorts of repair have never had to go to either Australia or New Zealand anyway,” Mr Inwood said.
    “I think both the Australian and New Zealand governments have made it clear to Japan that the vessels are not to dock in New Zealand or Australia.
    “Having said that, the ICR is not making any comment on the status of their vessels or their whereabouts, or the status of the research.”

    Cpt Watson said the damage to the Yushin Maru No.2 probably occurred when the harpoon ship headed into thick ice while being pursued by his protest ship, the Steve Irwin.
    Last year, Sea Shepherd activists Benjamin Potts and Giles Lane boarded the Yushin Maru No.2 to deliver a letter of protest.

    The damaged Japanese ship was not expected to be fixed until Thursday, and Cpt Watson said its loss would be a blow to whalers’ plans to kill 935 minke whales and 50 fin whales this season.
    Greenpeace said Australia regularly denied access to Japanese whalers except in cases of genuine distress.
    “The Federal Court ruled on 15 January 2008 that Japanese whaling fleets operations in Australian Antarctic waters are illegal,” Greenpeace said in a statement.
    “Australia’s claim over these waters is not accepted by Japan and some other nations.”

    The Steve Irwin is expected to reach Hobart this week to refuel before heading back to confront the Japanese whaling fleet early next week.

    http://animals-in-the-news.blogspot.com/2009/01/beschadigde-japanse-walvisvaarder-yushi.html

  17. moryah4 Says:

    RESCUERS STRUGGLE TO SAVE SPERM WHALES IN MASS STRANDING OFF TASMANIA

    Matthew Denholm

    ( from “The Australian” newspaper , January 23, 2009 )

    WILDLIFE officers are desperately trying to save five whales that are the only survivors from a pod of almost 50 that beached off Tasmania.

    An estimated 43 sperm whales stranded on a sandbank near the mouth of the Duck River, in the state’s northwest, have already died.

    A small group of Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife staff are battling the odds to keep the remaining five alive overnight before trying to refloat them on tomorrow morning’s high tide.

    The sheer size of the massive mammals – 18 metres long and up to 20 tonnes in weight – is complicating the would-be rescue.

    “Six (rescue) staff are maintaining them – keeping them as comfortable as possible and pouring water over them,” said Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman Liz Wren.

    “They are looking at whether it will be possible to attempt a rescue, which cannot be until the next high tide tomorrow morning.

    “They are very heavy creatures, weighing 13 to 20 tonnes, and this places a lot of pressure on their internal organs.”

    While sperm whales had been successfully rescued in the past, the shallow water at the site and the weight of the animals would make a positive outcome difficult.

    It is the second-largest stranding of sperm whales in Tasmania and occurred at about 6.30pm yesterday.

    Fifty sperm whales stranded at Ocean Beach, near Strahan, in 1998.

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24952506-601,00.html

    There seem to be a lot of whale strandings in Tasmania.

    This one from late last year:

    “ANOTHER MASS WHALE STRANDING IN TASMANIA”

    Posted Sat Nov 29, 2008

    There has been another mass whale stranding in Tasmania.

    Authorities say between 60 and 80 long-finned pilot whales have been stranded on rocks at Sandy Cape, on the state’s remote west coast.

    It is believed only about 12 of the whales have survived the stranding and it is not known how long the mammals have been there.

    (more…)

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/11/29/2433377.htm

    Zarlen said there is an oil exploration company in Bass Strait who use seismic exploration techniques ( a form of ultrasound technology ).

    A controversial theory, researched by Jim Berkland, a former geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, attributes the strange behaviour of whales beaching themsleves to radical changes in the Earth’s magnetic field just prior to earthquakes and in the general area of earthquakes. Berkland says when this occurs, it interferes with sea mammals’ and even migratory birds’ ability to navigate, which explains the mass beachings. He says even dogs and cats can sense the disruptions, which explains elevated rates of runaway pets in local newspapers a day or two before earthquakes occur. Research on Earth’s magnetic field and how it is affected by moving tectonic plates and earthquakes is ongoing.

    We know whales and dolphins have far more sophisticated brains when it comes to their hearing and the range of sounds they can hear is the broadest of all mammals .

    It is interesting that Zarlen said ultrasound could be detrimental during human pregnancy.
    The rule of thumb he said is one ultrasound is OK, two if ‘absolutely’necessary,but if you go beyond two you will damage the neuron cells of the growing infant.

    Dr Jon Sherwood said the ultrasound activities of an oil company in the Bass Strait ,searching for oil depositsd activated the massive earthquake that triggered the Tsunami in the Indian Ocean in 2004.The oil company siad Dr Jon were feeding ultrasound into the same faultline as the quake minutes before the quake (the second biggest ever recorded) hit.The tsunami it triggered Known now as the Boxing Day tsunami killed over 300,000 people with many bodies either being lost to the sea or unidentified. Some unofficial estimates have claimed that approximately 1 million people may have died directly or indirectly solely as a result of the tsunami.
    About 80% of all tsunamis occur in the Pacific Ocean, but are possible wherever large bodies of water are found, including inland lakes. They may be caused by landslides, volcanic explosions, bolides and seismic activity.
    Also according to an article in “Geographical” magazine (April 2008), the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004 was not the worst that the region could expect. Professor Costas Synolakis of the Tsunami Research Center at the University of Southern California co-authored a paper in “Geophysical Journal International” which suggests that a future tsunami in the Indian Ocean basin could affect locations such as Madagascar, Singapore, Somalia, Western Australia and many others.

    There are various oil comapnies in the Bass Strait but the main oil exploration company located in Bass Strait who initiated a new form of ultrasound technology in their search a year or two prior to the 2004 Tsunami ,is the Exxon-BHP Billiton company.

    but getting back to the whales, we humans invade their space with sonar and ultrasound,and even our thought energy said Zarlen.Consider the fact our thoughts consist of electromagentic which in turn gets gets earthed through the human form and in the natural environment distorts the whales navigation .Remember you have approximately 6.76 people on the earth of whom Zarlen said, at any given time, are thinking negative thoughts. This enrgy gets emiited into the natural environment causing disturbance to the natural flow of things.Whales are receptive and thought energy carries a frequency,which carries a sound,so you can imagine the havoc we cause our gentle giant navigators.But remember that Zarlen also siad the whales and other cetaceans will only take so much before they send this energy back,as they are capable of an amazing sound repertoire.
    Do you also remember last year when the Japanese ,as this year were massacring whales in the southern oceans and Dr Jon siad they would get payback from the whales (i.e earthquake activity) and it happened ?
    Well watch what happens this year.I predict things will get worse quake-wise as Dr Jon/Zarlen have already stated.
    BHP Billiton are they a culprit as well,perhaps the Aussie Navy have been using sonar and what of the US Mc Murdo base in Antarctica with their subtle enrgy weapons being tested there.Watch for the catastrophes of those .

    (Thanks for the Wickipedia references used in this article)

  18. moryah4 Says:

    WHALES PERISH

    Only two whales are still alive after the mass beaching of sperm whales on a remote island off Tasmania’s north-west tip.
    The pod of about 50 whales,mostly mothers and claves,beached on Perkins Island ,near the mouth of the Duck river at Smithton on Thursday night.

    More than 150 long-finned pilot whales also died in another beaching in Tasmania last year at Sandy Cape,a remote coastal area :

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7757231.stm

    (”The Sunday Telegraph” newspaper,25th January,2009.)

  19. moryah4 Says:

    SECRET WHALING COMMISSIN DEAL COULD INCREASE JAPAN’S QUOTA

    Written by Alex Felsinger

    Published on January 27th, 2009

    Under a secret deal brokered between the six nations of the International Whaling Commission, Japan could be able to increase its whaling quota in the Northern Pacific Ocean in exchange for an agreement to slowly cut all its operations in the antarctic.

    “This is Whalergate,” said Patrick Ramage, the global director of the International Fund for Animals anti-whaling program. “We have had growing concerns about the talks under way behind closed doors in the IWC. Those concerns are increased by the leaking of this secret plan.”

    Under the document, apparently written mostly by Bush-appointee IWC head Bill Hogarth, Japan would phase out whaling in the antarctic by 20% for five consqcutive years, eventually ending whaling in the waters entirely. The killing of humpback and fin whales, which are endangered, would be ended immediately.

    In exchange, “a larger quota could be assigned for coastal whaling provided that all annual quotas are consistent with the advice of the Scientific Committee,” according to the plan.

    Japan says it will kill up to 1,000 whales this season. Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has been in the Southern Ocean protesting and directly engaging the whalers this season, just as they did last year as featured in the television show Whale wars.

    Captain Paul Watson said the organization will continue to pursue the whaling fleet as long as they continue to kill whales.

    More posts about the effort to end whaling:

    http://planetsave.com/blog/2009/01/27/secret-whaling-commission-deal-could-increase-japan%E2%80%99s-quota/

  20. moryah4 Says:

    Quote Dr Jon Sherwood:

    “If humanity is to survive then it has to learn to treat other animals as equal. The japanese said to me once during a conference once they have lost their spirituality and wanted to rediscover it. Well the whale hunting is sure not the way to go to get it back!

    There is a time to stop and that time is now.”

    (The following 2008-2009 Report coutesy of the Sea Shepherd organization)

    “JAPANESE PLAN TO SLAUGHTER 60 WHALES OFF THE COAST OF JAPAN ”

    The Japanese whaling industry have unleashed their whaling ships into the waters off their own Northeastern coast to viciously slaughter 60 piked (Minke) whales.
    The proposed slaughter will be illegal and the killing is not endorsed or sanctioned by the International Whaling Commission.
    Once again Japan is justifying the slaughter under the absurd excuse of “research.”
    The whalers are trying to compensate for losses caused by Sea Shepherd interventions in the Southern Ocean in December 2008 and January and February 2009. The Japanese Fisheries Agency reported to the media that the environmentalist group Sea Shepherd made it impossible for the whaling vessels to operate on 16 days of the 100-day whale hunt.

    The six ships caught 679 Minke and one fin whale on the mission, the agency said. These numbers were well below the planned haul of between 765 and 935 of the giant mammals.
    The whalers need to kill at least 765 whales to break even. As a result they suffered losses of tens of millions of dollars.

    The Sea Shepherd ship Steve Irwin and her crew chased and shut down the whaling operations for more than five weeks. Japan claims 16 days but that would mean that they would have fallen only 128 whales short of their set quota based on an average kill of 8 whales per day. The whalers failed to reach their set quota by 305 which means that Sea Shepherd prevented whaling activities for 38 days which validates the Sea Shepherd claim that whaling was shut down for five and a half weeks - not 16 days as Japan claims.
    Four whaling ships and one designated “research” vessel will set sail soon from Ayukawa port in northern Miyagi prefecture and hunt whales within 80 kilometers (50 miles) off the coast until late May, the official said.
    Japan wants to launch the new whaling mission ahead of the International Whaling Commission’s annual general meeting in June in Madeira, Portugal. The IWC will not have an opportunity to censure these illegal whaling activities until after the whales are killed. Japan is gambling that the member nations will do little more than make a noisy fuss about the violations of IWC regulations.
    Sea Shepherd say the Japanese have learned that the IWC is just a paper shark, all talk and no action.

    http://www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/news-090421-1.html

  21. moryah4 Says:

    Japanese Plan Slaughter 60 whales off the Coast of Japan

    The Japanese whaling industry(whom the conservation group Sea shepherd claim are Yakuza controlled) have unleashed their whaling ships into the waters off their own Northeastern coast to viciously slaughter 60 piked (Minke) whales.
    The slaughter was illegal and the killing is not endorsed or sanctioned by the International Whaling Commission.
    Once again Japan justifies this type of slaughter under the absurd excuse of “research.”
    The whalers are trying to compensate for losses caused by Sea Shepherd interventions in the Southern Ocean in December 2008 and January and February 2009. The Japanese Fisheries Agency reported to the media that the environmentalist group Sea Shepherd made it impossible for the whaling vessels to operate on 16 days of the 100-day whale hunt.
    The six ships caught 679 Minke and one fin whale on the mission, the agency said. These numbers were well below the planned haul of between 765 and 935 of the giant mammals.
    The whalers need to kill at least 765 whales to break even. As a result they suffered losses of tens of millions of dollars.
    The Sea Shepherd ship Steve Irwin and her crew chased and shut down the whaling operations for more than five weeks. Japan claims 16 days but that would mean that they would have fallen only 128 whales short of their set quota based on an average kill of 8 whales per day. The whalers failed to reach their set quota by 305 which means that Sea Shepherd prevented whaling activities for 38 days which validates the Sea Shepherd claim that whaling was shut down for five and a half weeks - not 16 days as Japan claims.
    Four whaling ships and one designated “research” vessel set sail soon from Ayukawa port in northern Miyagi prefecture hunting whales within 80 kilometers (50 miles) off the coast until late May, the official said.
    Japan wanted to launch the new whaling mission ahead of the International Whaling Commission’s annual general meeting in June in Madeira, Portugal. The IWC did not have an opportunity to censure these illegal whaling activities until after the whales were killed. Japan was gambling that the member nations would do little more than make a noisy fuss about the violations of IWC regulations. The Japanese have learned that the IWC is just a paper shark, all talk and no action.

    http://www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/news-090421-1.html

  22. moryah4 Says:

    (From late last year but let’s not let this on slide under the carpet !)

    Certain countries think they have the right to use and abuse nature when no one is looking BUT THE TRUTH ALWAYS COMES OUT IN THE END AND.. NATURE’S REPRISAL .

    (By The Way What Is That Stench eminating From Greenland Way ?”)

    Grisly find off coast of Greenland

    (Thu, 07 May. 2009)

    A Northland whale expert has found dozens of massacred narwhals on the east coast of Greenland.
    Tutukaka’s Ingrid Visser, founder of the Orca Research Trust, found the carcasses of 48 narwhals while guiding tourists on a nature cruise aboard the Polar Pioneer in Arctic waters.
    The narwhal, which has a single long tusk, is a small Arctic whale long hunted for its “ivory”.
    The whale bodies were in the Romerfjord, south of the isolated eastern Greenland town of Ittoqqortoormiit.
    Dr Visser, the ship’s naturalist, told the Greenland newspaper Sermitsiaq that she found 48 whales, and only three of the carcasses had been butchered for meat.
    On many of the other whales, only the tusks had been taken.

    http://www.northernadvocate.co.nz/

  23. moryah4 Says:

    Quote : Dr Jon Sherwood,September 4th, 2008 :

    Whales And The Future of Humanity

    “So who said humanity was the only intelligent life on the planet. Do the Japanese think they have majority rule on intelligence I think not!

    “To hunt a species to extinction is not logical” Gee I wonder where I heard this before!

    To disguise the action in the name of science I am suprised that many other scientists have not jumped and screamed about that one. That is unless they are all in the same boat!

    You would think by now that humanity would have grown beyond killing other creatures just for the profit. There are also other reasons they say they do it but none are worth their salt in truth.

    If humanity is to survive then it has to learn to treat other animals as equal. The japanese said to me once during a conference once they have lost their spirituality and wanted to rediscover it. Well the whale hunting is sure not the way to go to get it back!

    There is a time to stop and that time is now. Any country that kills like this indiscriminately has a price to pay and that price will be high and the environment has a nasty way of sending back what you give off. All creatures on this planet even humans are a part of the biosphere. Mistreat it and it will come back at you big time! ”

    THE FOLLOWING NEWS REPORT FROM THE “AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPER”:

    “Dolphin Kill Film To Shock Taiji Sister City Broome”

    ( Michael Bodey)

    June 12, 2009 .

    PRESSURE will mount on Broome (Australia) to dump its Japanese sister city, Taiji, after the Australian premiere of the new documentary The Cove.
    American Louie Psihoyos’s film reveals undercover footage from the Japanese port of the systematic annual capture and slaughter of thousands of dolphins for sale and consumption.

    “It’s like an Auschwitz for dolphins,” said Psihoyos, in Australia for the documentary’s Sydney Film Festival premiere.

    “A lot of people who work in this industry feel it’s going to put the nail in the coffin of the dolphin hunting industry,” said the photographer for National Geographic and director of the Oceanic Preservation Society.

    “There’s no way it can keep going on, not just because of the inhumanity to animals but because of the inhumanity to man. People don’t realise these dolphins they’re eating are toxic.”

    Psihoyos’s environmental film is also a thriller, as his team, bankrolled in part by Jim Clark, the American billionaire husband of Australian model Kirsty Hinze, infiltrates a guarded cove next to the whaling town, south of Osaka.

    They are intimidated, followed and harassed by townsfolk trying to protect their livelihood.

    The team’s undercover footage, captured largely by cameras under fake rocks designed by a Hollywood special effects house, is unforgettable. It shows the herding and butchering of hundreds of dolphins in a secluded cove, turning the water red with blood.

    Some of the netted dolphins will be sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars to aquariums, but most will be sold as dolphin meat or as a substitute for whale meat.

    “The Taiji government and the Japanese government have done an excellent job so far of keeping quiet what goes on in that secret cove,” Psihoyos said.

    “Now the secret’s out, and the question is what does the rest of humanity do…”

    (Read the full report here) :

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25623722-16947,00.html

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